8 Simple Strategies To Improve Your Innovation

5. Find Important People And Problems.  Focus Your Mind On Them.

Hamming would seek out stimulating lunch partners in different fields.  For example, he ate at the physics table because at the math table he wasn’t learning much.  Then he started eating at the chemistry table and asked them “What are the important problems of your field?” and “What important problems are you working on?”  They couldn’t answer him and he wasn’t invited back.  When you want to solve a difficult problem, “don’t let anything else get the center of your attention…keep your thoughts on the problem.  Keep your subconscious starved so it has to work on your problem, so you can sleep peacefully and get the answer in the morning, free.”

 Lesson: Seek out stimulating people because they can help you find important problems to solve.  When you are working on an important problem don’t let anything distract you.  A truly deep commitment is necessary for first class work.

 6. Prepare Your Mind For Opportunity

 Once you have identified these problems, you need to determine which problems can be effectively attacked.  At any given time, great scientists have “between 10 and 20 important problems for which they are looking for an attack.”  Hamming notes “when an opportunity opens up, [they] get after it and pursue it…They get rid of other things and they get after an idea because they had already thought the thing through.  Their minds are prepared; they see the opportunity and they go after it.”

 Lesson: Have ideas about how to approach problems thought through so when opportunity comes, you are ready to fully seize it.

 7. Work With the Door Open. You Will Sense What Is Important

 Hamming noted “if you have the door to your office closed, you get more work done today and tomorrow, and you are more productive than most.  But 10 years later somehow you don’t quite know what problems are worth working on.”  He sensed people with an “open door” tended to do important things, whereas people with a “closed door” often worked harder, but on slightly the wrong thing.  He recommended every seven years you should make a significant, if not complete, shift in your field to stay fresh and creative.  As a cautionary tale he described a colleague that spent all his time reading the research journals in the library.  “If you read all the time what other people have done you will the think the way they thought.  If you want to think new thoughts that are different, then do what creative people do – get the problem reasonably clear and then refuse to look at any answers until you’ve thought the problem through carefully how you would do it, how you could slightly change the problem to be the correct one.”

 Lesson: “Working with the door open” today is really about being open to other fields, ideas, and thoughts that are outside your area of expertise.  In order to identify problems worth solving, don’t get stuck by just learning from people in one field.

8. Know When To Work With The System, And When To Go It Alone                                               

 If you work single handedly, you go as far as you can alone.  If you work with the system, you sometimes can use it to your advantage.  Hamming says “good scientists will fight the system rather than learn to work with the system.”  Part of the problem is ego-assertion and personality defects.  For example, Tukey would dress very casually, and when meeting someone new it would take time for the other party to take him seriously.  Sometimes it is the appearance of conforming that gets you a long way.

Of course, original people tend to fight the system just because this is part of being original.  Hamming: “You can’t be an original scientist without having some other original characteristics.”  But sometimes your quirks can make you pay a far higher price than what you get in return.  He asks: “Which do you want to be? The person who changes the system or the person who does first-class science?”

 Lesson: In any organization there will be expectations to conform.  Even though you want to be original all the time, it can pay to have the appearance of conformity.  There are moments to fight and change the system, and moments to work with the system to produce a first class product.  Of course, sometimes, you must have the courage to go it alone.

 

5. Find Important People And Problems.  Focus Your Mind On Them.

Hamming would seek out stimulating lunch partners in different fields.  For example, he ate at the physics table because at the math table he wasn’t learning much.  Then he started eating at the chemistry table and asked them “What are the important problems of your field?” and “What important problems are you working on?”  They couldn’t answer him and he wasn’t invited back.  When you want to solve a difficult problem, “don’t let anything else get the center of your attention…keep your thoughts on the problem.  Keep your subconscious starved so it has to work on your problem, so you can sleep peacefully and get the answer in the morning, free.”

 Lesson: Seek out stimulating people because they can help you find important problems to solve.  When you are working on an important problem don’t let anything distract you.  A truly deep commitment is necessary for first class work.

 6. Prepare Your Mind For Opportunity

 Once you have identified these problems, you need to determine which problems can be effectively attacked.  At any given time, great scientists have “between 10 and 20 important problems for which they are looking for an attack.”  Hamming notes “when an opportunity opens up, [they] get after it and pursue it…They get rid of other things and they get after an idea because they had already thought the thing through.  Their minds are prepared; they see the opportunity and they go after it.”

 Lesson: Have ideas about how to approach problems thought through so when opportunity comes, you are ready to fully seize it.

 7. Work With the Door Open. You Will Sense What Is Important

 Hamming noted “if you have the door to your office closed, you get more work done today and tomorrow, and you are more productive than most.  But 10 years later somehow you don’t quite know what problems are worth working on.”  He sensed people with an “open door” tended to do important things, whereas people with a “closed door” often worked harder, but on slightly the wrong thing.  He recommended every seven years you should make a significant, if not complete, shift in your field to stay fresh and creative.  As a cautionary tale he described a colleague that spent all his time reading the research journals in the library.  “If you read all the time what other people have done you will the think the way they thought.  If you want to think new thoughts that are different, then do what creative people do – get the problem reasonably clear and then refuse to look at any answers until you’ve thought the problem through carefully how you would do it, how you could slightly change the problem to be the correct one.”

 Lesson: “Working with the door open” today is really about being open to other fields, ideas, and thoughts that are outside your area of expertise.  In order to identify problems worth solving, don’t get stuck by just learning from people in one field.

8. Know When To Work With The System, And When To Go It Alone                                               

 If you work single handedly, you go as far as you can alone.  If you work with the system, you sometimes can use it to your advantage.  Hamming says “good scientists will fight the system rather than learn to work with the system.”  Part of the problem is ego-assertion and personality defects.  For example, Tukey would dress very casually, and when meeting someone new it would take time for the other party to take him seriously.  Sometimes it is the appearance of conforming that gets you a long way.

Of course, original people tend to fight the system just because this is part of being original.  Hamming: “You can’t be an original scientist without having some other original characteristics.”  But sometimes your quirks can make you pay a far higher price than what you get in return.  He asks: “Which do you want to be? The person who changes the system or the person who does first-class science?”

 Lesson: In any organization there will be expectations to conform.  Even though you want to be original all the time, it can pay to have the appearance of conformity.  There are moments to fight and change the system, and moments to work with the system to produce a first class product.  Of course, sometimes, you must have the courage to go it alone.

 

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