8 Myths About Creativity

Post published by Susan K Perry Ph.D. on Apr 25, 2015 in Creating in Flowidea-brainstorming
I include myself when I say that we often rationalize in order to put off the creative work we value. Is it possible that some of the following myths are the basis for your own procrastination?
1. I need big chunks of time to be creative. All you really need is a few minutes a day devoted to whatever your dream is. (Sure, bigger chunks are wonderful, but little chunks, regularly, do add up.)
2. I need certain conditions to feel inspired. Inspiration can happen anywhere and anytime, but you have to be flexible about setting up your creative environment. Turn off the phone, tell your family this is your recharging time.
3. If no one believes in my ability, I should give up. Only you have to believe in yourself, and only you know how much of your life you’re willing to devote to your dream. Be very careful who you ask to judge you.
4. There’s no point in being an amateur artist. Many people find enormous psychic rewards while remaining amateurs. Besides, lots of practice sometimes results in work that goes beyond amateur level. Stick with it.
5. I must always strive for perfection. Perfection doesn’t exist. Some perfectionists achieve a lot, but they drive themselves crazy. Very very good, or the best YOU can do, is probably perfect enough.
6. Everything interesting has already been written, drawn, or imagined, so why bother re-inventing the wheel? Don’t bother if you have nothing to add to humanity’s conversation. But remember, your own story or your twist on an older story is unique to you.
7. The art supplies I need are too expensive. If you’re both creative and flexible, you can find sources of less expensive materials.
8. I have so many family responsibilities that I feel selfish when I take time to write. If so, then find ways to cut other activities. Clean less often (including yourself), make simpler meals, forget about big holiday celebrations, shop much less and shop online, give chores to the kids, only attend group activities that nourish you. You have a right to pursue your own dreams, if only in smaller bits of time.
*** For more on how to get moving toward your goals, I recommend the following two new books from which I gathered the above myths:
1. Art Before Breakfast: A Zillion Ways to Be Creative No Matter How Busy You Are, by Danny Gregory. Especially aimed at visual artists, but inspiring for any kind of would-be maker of any kind of art. Playfully illustrated.
2. Hop, Skip, Jump: 75 Ways to Playfully Manifest A Meaningful Life, by Marney K. Makridakis. Not limited to making art, this book uses suprising tools and exercises to help you gain momentum toward any goal at all.

Post published by Susan K Perry Ph.D. on Apr 25, 2015 in Creating in Flowidea-brainstorming
I include myself when I say that we often rationalize in order to put off the creative work we value. Is it possible that some of the following myths are the basis for your own procrastination?
1. I need big chunks of time to be creative. All you really need is a few minutes a day devoted to whatever your dream is. (Sure, bigger chunks are wonderful, but little chunks, regularly, do add up.)
2. I need certain conditions to feel inspired. Inspiration can happen anywhere and anytime, but you have to be flexible about setting up your creative environment. Turn off the phone, tell your family this is your recharging time.
3. If no one believes in my ability, I should give up. Only you have to believe in yourself, and only you know how much of your life you’re willing to devote to your dream. Be very careful who you ask to judge you.
4. There’s no point in being an amateur artist. Many people find enormous psychic rewards while remaining amateurs. Besides, lots of practice sometimes results in work that goes beyond amateur level. Stick with it.
5. I must always strive for perfection. Perfection doesn’t exist. Some perfectionists achieve a lot, but they drive themselves crazy. Very very good, or the best YOU can do, is probably perfect enough.
6. Everything interesting has already been written, drawn, or imagined, so why bother re-inventing the wheel? Don’t bother if you have nothing to add to humanity’s conversation. But remember, your own story or your twist on an older story is unique to you.
7. The art supplies I need are too expensive. If you’re both creative and flexible, you can find sources of less expensive materials.
8. I have so many family responsibilities that I feel selfish when I take time to write. If so, then find ways to cut other activities. Clean less often (including yourself), make simpler meals, forget about big holiday celebrations, shop much less and shop online, give chores to the kids, only attend group activities that nourish you. You have a right to pursue your own dreams, if only in smaller bits of time.
*** For more on how to get moving toward your goals, I recommend the following two new books from which I gathered the above myths:
1. Art Before Breakfast: A Zillion Ways to Be Creative No Matter How Busy You Are, by Danny Gregory. Especially aimed at visual artists, but inspiring for any kind of would-be maker of any kind of art. Playfully illustrated.
2. Hop, Skip, Jump: 75 Ways to Playfully Manifest A Meaningful Life, by Marney K. Makridakis. Not limited to making art, this book uses suprising tools and exercises to help you gain momentum toward any goal at all.

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